#SourceSaturday: Fellowships Available the Kentucky Historical Society

khs fellowship flyer

The Kentucky Historical Society (KHS) contains multiple collections of interest to equine history researchers, and offers short-term research fellowships for scholars. As Frankfort is conveniently located in central Kentucky, the International Museum of the Horse at the Kentucky Horse Park, Keeneland Library, Ashland (Henry Clay Estate), and other potential places of interest are also accessible. The 2019 funding cycle deadlines are March 1 and October 1. For more information about the fellowship guidelines and how to apply, see https://history.ky.gov/for-researchers/research-fellowships/fellowship-guidelines/.

Collections of interest include, but certainly are not limited to:

Alexander Family Papers/Woodburn Farm
Stephanie M. Lang (Associate Editor, Register of the Kentucky Historical Society, and Coordinator, KHS Research Fellowship Program) informs us that this is one of the largest collections at the KHS, and equine history scholars have found it to be of particular interest; research with this collection has included the development of Thoroughbred bloodlines, Civil War horses, and modern veterinary medicine. The letters with the horse image in the KHS fellowship flyer above are from this collection!

African Americans in the Thoroughbred Industry Oral History Project
From their website: “This series focuses on the experiences of African Americans working in the thoroughbred industry in Kentucky. The majority of interviews focus on backside occupations including hot walkers, exercise riders, and groomers. Other occupations include trainers, clockers, and jockeys. Interviewees discuss employment opportunities for African Americans in the racing industry, individuals they have worked with including owners and trainers, living conditions at the track, how they were trained in various occupations, working on horse farms, family life, race horses they have worked with, and the Kentucky Derby. Most of the interviews were conducted in Louisville with individuals who have worked at Churchill Downs.”

Frank Bradshaw Collection
From their website: Frank Bradshaw “bred, and showed saddlebred horses at many horse shows across America from the 1950s until the 1980s… This collection consists of photographs, both color and black and white, of Frank Bradshaw and his work as a breeder, trainer and shower of saddlebred horses. Several of the photographs are of him and a horse he was showing in a horse show. One of the most famous saddlebred horses he showed was ‘My My.’ The collection also has 0.5 cubic feet of manuscripts that were mainly his business records regarding breeding and training horses on his horse farm. There are also several periodicals relating to horses, horse shows and the saddlebred horse world. Frank Bradshaw and the horses he showed are included in several of these publications. There are also rare books and pamphlets related to horse shows and saddlebred horses.”

Ronald Morgan Postcard Collection
This collection contains about 11,000 Kentucky postcards dating from the late 19th century to the present, and includes a variety of horse postcards.

EHC’s Most Wanted Books

Every Sunday, we will be running short reviews of equine history books. For more information on how to write for us, see the submissions tab. Reviews of equestrian components of non-equine books are welcome. Below is our “most wanted” list. These are recent equine-centric publications, many of which major gaps in scholarship.

Derry, Margaret. Horses in Society A Story of Animal Breeding and Marketing Culture, 1800-1920. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2016. UNDER REVIEW

Forrest, Susanna. The Age of the Horse: An Equine Journey through Human History.
London: Atlantic Books, 2016.

Letts, Elizabeth. The Perfect Horse: The Daring Mission to Rescue Priceless Stallions from the Nazis. Ballantine Books, 2016. REVIEWED

McGraw, Eliza R. L. Here Comes Exterminator!: The Longshot Horse, the Great War, and the Making of an American Hero. St. Martin’s Press, 2016. UNDER REVIEW

Mooney, Katherine C. Race Horse Men: How Slavery and Freedom Were Made at the Racetrack. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 2014. REVIEWED

Taylor, Tobi, and Stephanie J Corum. Orzel: Scottsdale’s Legendary Arabian Stallion,
Charleston, SC : History Press, 2016.

Tomassini, Giovanni Battista. The Italian Tradition of Equestrian Art: A Survey of the Treatises on Horsemanship from the Renaissance and the Centuries,  Xenophon Press, 2014.

Willekes, Carolyn. The Horse in the Ancient World: From Bucephalus to the Hippodrome.
I.B. Tauris & Co. Ltd., 2016.

Other submissions are of course welcome, but these will be given priority. See our bibliography for more reading suggestions.