#MemberMonday: Chelsea Shields-Más

chelsea
Chelsea Shields-Más

SUNY College at Old Westbury
PhD, History, University of York, UK (2014)
MA, Medieval Studies, University of York, UK (2010)
BA, Medieval Studies, Mount Holyoke College (2008)

What got you in to history? horse history?
   My love for history and horses has been intertwined for as long as I can remember. I’ve loved horses since about age 2… there seems to be no rhyme or reason for this passion (i.e. no one else in my family rides), and family members joke that “horses are in my blood.” At a young age I developed a love for the medieval period facilitated by reading early Irish, English and Norse myths and legends, learning about knights and medieval warfare and my dad bringing me on trips to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Cloisters in NYC.

Who is your favorite historical horse?
   Alexander the Great’s Bucephalus [Kat Boniface’s answer, too!]

What are you working on now?
  My doctoral research focused on law and administration in late Anglo-Saxon England. My monograph, The Reeve in Late Anglo-Saxon England is in submission with Boydell and Brewer Ltd (forthcoming 2019). In my study of the reeve as an estate manager, I have come across interesting sources on the horse and horse management in late Anglo-Saxon England, which is a project I am also currently researching. Additional research interests include Anglo-Saxon diplomatic, law and administration, Anglo-Saxon culture and prosopography, the horse in antiquity and the Middle Ages, medieval urban history, environmental history of the West from Antiquity through the Middle Ages, the Crusades, Roman Britain and Roman history and literature.

Anything else you’d like to add?
   I’ve ridden since age 7 and have done dressage exclusively since about age 15. My love of and interest in dressage was in part sparked by reading Xenophon and learning about Classical and Medieval training of war horses. I have had my current equine partner (and best friend), an Appaloosa gelding named Goodnight Moon, since I was 15 and he was 5.

Chelsea Shields-Más will be presenting “If Wishes were Horses: Building a Picture of Late Anglo-Saxon Equine Management and Care” at our inaugural conference.

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#SourceSaturday: Veterinary Medicine Historical Collection, Michigan State University

By Janice Gunther Martin

The Veterinary Medicine Historical Collection at Michigan State University contains bountiful resources for anyone interested in the history of equine medicine, along with veterinary medicine in general. The collection includes over 1,400 manuscripts and books, dating as far back as the fifteenth century, making it one of the largest collections of its kind in the United States.

Equine-related works are especially well-represented in the Collection. It mainly focuses on books published or written before 1800, with particular strength in eighteenth-century British texts. Highlights include:

  • A fifteenth-century manuscript of Giordano Ruffo’s Libro marischalcie equorum;
  • The only known first edition of Francisco de la Reyna’s Libro de albeyteria (1547);
  • The first illustrated edition of Marcus Fugger’s Von der Gestüterey (1584), on horse breeding.

You can see more examples from the collection in their online exhibit “The History of Equine Anatomy in Veterinary Medicine.”

The Veterinary Medicine Historical Collection is housed in MSU’s Special Collections, recently renovated and in the main library on campus. A partial catalogue of the Collection is available online, also available in PDF form; for all holdings, see the MSU Library Catalogue. It is possible to register and request works to examine before your visit. They are open nearly every day of the week during the academic year.

For more information:

Michigan State Special Collections, East Lansing, MI

Staff Directory

Hours

Francisco de la Reyna, Libro de albeyteria, 1547

Carlo Ruini, Dell’ anotomia et dell’ infirmita del cavallo, 1598


Georg Simon Winter, Trattato nuovo … del far la razza di cavalli, 1672

 

The Compleat Horse Doctor, 17__?

EHC’s Most Wanted Books

Every Sunday, we will be running short reviews of equine history books. For more information on how to write for us, see the submissions tab. Reviews of equestrian components of non-equine books are welcome. Below is our “most wanted” list. These are recent equine-centric publications, many of which major gaps in scholarship.

Derry, Margaret. Horses in Society A Story of Animal Breeding and Marketing Culture, 1800-1920. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2016. UNDER REVIEW

Forrest, Susanna. The Age of the Horse: An Equine Journey through Human History.
London: Atlantic Books, 2016.

Letts, Elizabeth. The Perfect Horse: The Daring Mission to Rescue Priceless Stallions from the Nazis. Ballantine Books, 2016. REVIEWED

McGraw, Eliza R. L. Here Comes Exterminator!: The Longshot Horse, the Great War, and the Making of an American Hero. St. Martin’s Press, 2016. UNDER REVIEW

Mooney, Katherine C. Race Horse Men: How Slavery and Freedom Were Made at the Racetrack. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 2014. REVIEWED

Taylor, Tobi, and Stephanie J Corum. Orzel: Scottsdale’s Legendary Arabian Stallion,
Charleston, SC : History Press, 2016.

Tomassini, Giovanni Battista. The Italian Tradition of Equestrian Art: A Survey of the Treatises on Horsemanship from the Renaissance and the Centuries,  Xenophon Press, 2014.

Willekes, Carolyn. The Horse in the Ancient World: From Bucephalus to the Hippodrome.
I.B. Tauris & Co. Ltd., 2016.

Other submissions are of course welcome, but these will be given priority. See our bibliography for more reading suggestions.