#EqHist2018: Teresa Rogers on Maureen Love and the Kellogg Arabians

All month long we will be featuring speaker’s abstracts for the upcoming Equine History Conference: Why Equine History Matters. Register now!

Ceramic Artistry, Equine History: The Unknown Story of Maureen Love and the Kellogg Arabians
Teresa Rogers

   Since the 1920s, the W. K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Center has been a significant part of Southern California’s equestrian community. The names of horses bred at the Kellogg Ranch, such as the important stallions Abu Farwa and Ferseyn, appear in the pedigrees of show and pleasure horses today.

   But almost no one knows that the legacy of the horses of the Kellogg Ranch lives on, in display cases and toy boxes in countless American homes today.  Their legacy is found in retail shops, thrift stores, online, at horse events and collectors’ conventions across the country, and in the exhibit at the W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Library during the Equine History Conference.  The images of Abu Farwa and Ferseyn, along with other local horses of many breeds, were immortalized by artist Maureen Love (1922-2004) and turned into horse figurines by the California pottery Hagen-Renaker, Inc.  Several of Love’s designs for Hagen-Renaker were later reproduced in plastic by Breyer Animal Creations of New Jersey; both companies still produce them today.  Collectible model horse figurines have been affectionately called a “gateway drug” to the greater appreciation of real horses. 

   Since the 1950s, Hagen-Renaker and Breyer model horses have reflected the continuing importance of the horse in entertainment, education, pop culture, and local communities. My research helped inform the exhibit at WKKAHL; this paper will further illuminate the relationship between the quiet artist Maureen Love, the Kellogg Arabians and other Southern California horses she captured in her art, and the people who loved them.

Find more of Teresa Rogers’ work here.

 

 

 

 

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#EqHist2018: Lonneke Delpeut on “The Image of the Horse in Ancient Egypt”

All month long we will be featuring speaker’s abstracts for the upcoming Equine History Conference: Why Equine History Matters. Register now!

The Image of the Horse in Ancient Egypt: A Source of Information and a Piece of Art Lonneke Delpeut, Leiden University

    The horse was introduced into ancient Egyptian society around the beginning of the New Kingdom (ca. 1600 BC). From the beginning of the 18th dynasty, we see the horse depicted in funerary temples belonging to the pharaohs as well as in superstructures of private tombs of Egypt’s elite. My research is about the two-dimensional depictions of the horse, namely the difference between the image as a source of information compared to the image as a piece of art. Every image contains a certain amount of information, and can for example tell us about how the horse is used in Egyptian society, what the Egyptians knew about horses and their behaviour (for example, did they castrate?) and to what extent the horse can be seen as a status symbol. In return, it also tells us about the artistic side of the depiction: how did they transfer a three-dimensional concept into a two-dimensional one and from where did they get their inspiration? A study of the horse in motion tells us about the way the Egyptians displayed the horses’ gaits two-dimensionally. Where was the balance between artistic freedom and naturalistic display, and which of the two takes priority? My presentation will focus on what is depicted versus how it is depicted, and to what extent the representation is naturalistic. I will attempt to display how to read such images and how we might interpret them.

Read her Member Monday profile here.