#MemberMonday: J.N. Campbell

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M.A. History

M.A. History of Decorative Arts

What got you in to history? horse history?
   I’ve always enjoyed thinking about it, discussing it, and wading into it. If you are lucky enough to have grandparents and parents that instill a sense of the past, I think that is grist for the mill. I went to the University of Kentucky for graduate school, and I drank the kool-aid, along with a bunch of hot browns and burgoo. I took jobs at the Kentucky Horse Park, and spent time at Keeneland. If I could have my ashes spread across the Haggin Course I would.

   Horse racing is such an important part of the American fabric. I think scholars, whether attached to a university or independents, like myself, can do much to shed light on the state of the sport. Honestly, I am concerned. The local track in the hamlet or even in the mid to large-size city is under attack. My hope is that somehow racing will not just be someday at a handful of tracks like Santa Anita, Gulfstream, or at the NYRA courses. We have to do all we can to lobby, cast our nets widely, and support the Sam Houston Race Parks and Turfway Parks in our universe too. Otherwise, its going to be pretty grim.

Who is your favorite historical horse?

That’s like asking which kid do you like the most. I am partial to turf runners because 330px-Wise_Dan_2012_03I truly believe that running on the grass is the way it should be. I know that sounds crazy, but the dirt just doesn’t do it for me. I got to see John Henry in person after he retired. But, all-time is Wise Dan. That record, his style, and just the way he battled back time and time again. It was impressive to witness.

What are you working on now?
  I just finished up this past summer a new brief on the history of the opioid epidemic. It is called A Time-Release History of the Opioid Epidemic, published through Springer’s History of Chemistry Series. This is the second brief (History of Aspirin was the first) that I have published with a good friend of mine who is a chemist called Steve Rooney. Writing together is a true joy and it has brought us closer together through some tough spots. Right now, I am focused on writing a weekly editorial for The Sports Haven. Long-term, Steve and I plan to complete a third volume on the history of Lasix and its impact on American thoroughbred horse racing. Stay tuned!
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Shirts On Demand

   Bonfire, who makes our shirts, has now removed minimums on designs that have had a successful campaign. So, all of these designs are available on demand! They will print about every two weeks.

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Rearing Trojan Horse

Shirts, sweatshirts, hoodies
Mostly dark or jewel tone colors

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#AndBurros

Hashtag courtesy of Abbie Harlow,
from ASEH 2018
We love longears, too!

Three cuts of t-shirt, variety of colors

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Lascaux

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Nonprofit Status

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    The EHC is now a federal 501(c)3 public charity as well a registered charity in the State of California! All donations are tax deductible.

   The Equine History Collective promotes the horse as a lens for trans-regional history, and serves as an interface for related historical research in the humanities, sciences, and social sciences. We have three aims:

  • To make specialist and sometimes technical knowledge relevant and available to a broader audience of academic scholars in the discipline of history.
  • To provide a forum for connecting related research interests in equine studies across regional and chronological divisions within the discipline of history, mirroring the trends of transnational, connected world histories.
  • To provide a point of contact for inter-disciplinary collaboration with scholars in equine studies in the social sciences and sciences to provide a historically rigorous foundation or counterpoint to contemporary studies in fields ranging from genetics to sport culture and tourism.

   Our current focus is the Equine History 2018 Conference at the W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Library in Pomona, California. In addition to hosting an annual conference, our long term goals include the creation of equine history fellowships, collaboration with other historical groups, and public talks.

   If you are interested in sponsoring any of our projects, developing a partnership, or establishing a named fund to support any field of equine history, please contact us.

Board of Directors 2018-2020
Katrin Boniface
Janice Gunther Martin
Kathryn Renton

#MemberMonday: Mike Huggins

huggins
Mike Huggins
University of Cumbria

Ph. D., Lancaster University, 1999
Diploma in Reading Studies, Open University, 1988
Diploma in Management Studies, CNAA, 1986
MA, CNAA, 1983
Diploma in Religious Studies, Cambridge University, 1976
BA (Hons), Open University, 1975 (first class)
Certificate in Mathematics, National Extension College, 1969
Cert Ed, Durham, 1967

What got you in to history? horse history?
I initially taught in primary schools, specializing in reading, and later worked in teacher training and school inspection. But I did a doctorate on the nineteenth-century history of British horse racing to fill my time during the school holidays, and that motivated me to move into the academic world to teach leisure history.
Rather like Saul of Tarsus my conversion to horse history took a long time. I’ve never ridden a horse. Though amongst my many books are three on British racing’s history, covering the period from 1660 to 1939, including my most recent on the long eighteenth century, they’ve focused on cultural, social, economic and political themes and the debates about betting, and did not foreground the horses anywhere near as much as I should have. But I’m belatedly giving it more thought now.

Who is your favorite historical horse?Statue of Kincsem
Kincsem, the thoroughbred mare foaled in Hungary in 1874, is a favourite of mine, not least since mares can be overlooked. She won 54 races from 54 starts, many of them high standard, on racetracks across Europe, and later through her offspring influenced the breed.

What are you working on now?
I am currently exploring the cultural transfer and knowledge circulation of thoroughbred breeding and racing between Britain and Europe between 1700 and 1880.

 

#SourceSaturday: Dr. Fager’s Mile

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   50 years ago yesterday, Dr. Fager set a new world record for the dirt mile: 1:32 1/5. America’s Best Racing calls his record “unbreakable,” and certainly it has stood untouched for half a century. 

 Much of racing history is caught up in these statistics, but we also have at our disposal a century of video to examine not only what these horses did, but how. Watch Dr. Fager’s record smashing Washington Park Handicap here.

Image: DRF (click to read about his name sake).

#NationalNonprofitDay

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   Today is ! Did you know the EHC is a registered non-profit? We incorporated earlier this year in California in order to better support equine history scholarship. You can find our listing with the California Secretary of State here and our California Charity Registration here. This month we applied for Federal status.

   If you’d like to support the EHC’s goals, there are t-shirts currently available, and we also welcome direct donations. We welcome all with an interest in equine history. Questions, suggestions, or have a project we can help with? Let us know!

 

Board of Directors 2018-2020
Katrin Boniface

Janice Gunther Martin
Kathryn Renton