Save the Date! First EHC Conference Nov. 30-Dec. 2, 2018

Announcing the Equine History Conference!
Save the date: Fri. Nov. 30 – Sun Dec. 2, 2018
Organized by the Equine History Collective, the W. K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Library and the Kellogg Arabian Horse Center at Cal Poly Pomona

Calling all equine historians… We are delighted to announce the first annual conference and meeting of the Equine History Collective, in generous partnership with theW. K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Library  and Kellogg Arabian Center. The three-day conference will be held at the W. K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Library  on the campus of Cal Poly Pomona. Tours of the library and exhibits will be scheduled during the conference. Researchers are welcome and encouraged to contact the library archivists about making use of their special collections during their stay in Pomona. The conference will conclude with the traditional Sunday Arabian Show at the Kellogg Arabian Center.  Our official call for papers will follow!

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News from ASEH

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     The ASEH annual conference will be in Riverside, CA, March 14-18. There are a number of equine and animal presentations of interest. In addition, there will be a pre-ASEH twitter conference, sponsored by NiCHE, on March 8th & 9th. Submissions are due Feb. 21.

Persistence and Power: The Cultural, Symbolic, and Environmental Role of
Horses and Burros in Survivance in the American West
Lindsay Marshall, University of Oklahoma, “I’ve Been a Horse All My Life”: The
Persistence and Adaptability of Comanche Horse Culture in the Twentieth Century
Abbie Harlow, Arizona State University, “The Burro Evil”: The Eradication of Feral
Burros in Grand Canyon National Park
Kerri Keller Clement, University of Colorado-Boulder, Game of Horsepower: Robert
Yellowtail, Crow Horses, and Native American Power during the 1930s

Lightning Talks
Katrin Boniface, University of California-Riverside, Distributive Preservation & Heritage Livestock

Environment, Power, and Injustice in Southern African Histories
Sandra Swart, Stellenbosch University-South Africa, The Animal in the Mirror – Baboons and the Politics of Power

Managing the Health of People and Animals
Brian Tyrrell, University of California-Santa Barbara, Breeding the Bluegrass: A Political
Ecology of Kentucky’s Bluegrass Region

Elusive Beasts: Affective Encounters and the Politics of Representation
Sandra Swart, Stellenbosch University-South Africa, The Others – Animal Kinship and the Strangeness of Familiarity

 

CFP: 2018 ASI-UIUC Summer Institute in Human-Animal Studies

Animals & Society Institute: “Animal Studies Across the Disciplines” (Sunday July 8-Saturday July 14, 2018).  Directed by Jane Desmond (Resident Director), Kim Marra, Margo DeMello, and Kenneth Shapiro.

Application Deadline: February 15, 2018

  • The Animals & Society Institute and the Center for Advanced Study at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign invite applications for the second annual Summer Institute in Human-Animal Studies for advanced graduate students and early career scholars pursuing research in Human-Animal Studies.
  • The Institute is designed to support participants’ individual research in Human-Animal Studies as well as to promote interdisciplinary exchange.
  • At the heart of the program are daily morning seminars devoted to discussion of participants’ work, followed by afternoon plenary lectures by distinguished speakers.
  • The tuition fee for the Institute (which covers registration, housing, library access, special events, receptions, and seminars) is $800.  Some scholarships are available.

 

For more details and how to apply, see the full call for applications:

https://www.animalsandsociety.org/call-for-applications-2018-summer-institute-in-human-animal-studies/

CFP: Relationships with Humans and Animals in the Middle East and North Africa Region

Middle East Studies Association Call for PapersScreen Shot 2018-01-15 at 11.26.23 AM

     Humans and other animals share spaces, impact each other daily through work and leisure, and create communities together. Levi Strauss is famous for saying animals are “good to think with.” As anthropology is beginning to make the post-humanist or animal turn, it is time to think about how animals affect and create each other and humans in various symbolic and material ways, constantly crossing and redrawing communal, ethical, and practical boundaries. Tim Mitchell writes about “making the mosquito speak”, and how these small malaria-carrying animals had an impact on the outcome between the British and German forces during the Second World War in Egypt. Scholars have gradually asked questions about the human-animals in the West or Global North, but what about the Global South, specifically the Middle East and North Africa (MENA)?

     Animals of any size are on the fringes of the human world, but play important and interesting roles in the various cultures of the MENA. Horses and falcons enjoy valorization and continued elevated status of “noble” creatures, are bought and sold for thousands of dollars, thus leading to their own industry in terms of racing, breeding, hunting, and other elite leisure pursuits. Donkeys and mules in Fes, Morocco continue to be of vital importance carrying items up and down the winding streets of the old city, which are two narrow and steep for cars and most motorcycles. Native snakes are continually needed for the snake charming tourist acts in Marrakesh. The Arabian oryx was hunted to extinction in the wild, reintroduced, and is the national animal of Jordan, Oman, UAE, Bahrain and Qatar. Whale and dolphin watching tours are a popular activity in Oman. ISIS fighters used the Mosul Zoo as a staging area in October 2016.  The zoo saw severe losses and the final two animals were evacuated in April 2017. Animals are constantly in the crosshairs of society, conflict, cultural meanings, sports, and leisure pursuits. This panel invites papers addressing the status of animals in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) through history, anthrozoology, anthropology, political science, geography, and other relevant disciplines.

     The animals in this region pervade almost every aspect of culture and history. This panel asks: what is the human-animal relationship in the MENA region, how are animals used and viewed, how are animals (livestock, pets, sporting animals, wildlife) treated and what are the attitudes toward them. This panel will examine this interchange of animals in cultures past and present. Papers focusing on single countries, regions or comparative studies examining multiple locales or countries are welcome, as are papers from any single or combined disciplinary perspectives. 

     Authors are asked to submit a paper title, abstract (300-400 words), their professional or institutional affiliation, and contact information. Academic, non-academic, or other professional authors are invited to apply. In cases of co-authored works, only one submission (including the same information for each author) should be made. Papers will be accepted in English only. The deadline for abstract submissions is midnight 31 January 2018. You will be informed of the result by 2 February 2018.

     If the proposal is accepted, you will be required to register with MESA by 15 February 2018, although acceptance of the panel by MESA is not assured. Please consult the MESA website for further information about conference and registration procedures.

     We look forward to receiving your proposal, which you should send to guj.talley@gmail.com Please include MESA in the email title.

     We intend to publish the papers in a collective book, so strong preference will be given to authors/speakers who will subsequently be prepared to submit their papers by 15 January 2019.

#ShelfieSunday: War Horse: Mounting the Cavalry with America’s Finest Horses

warhorse

     War Horse started as a project by two horsemen to uncover the relationship between pedigree and confirmation, especially pertaining to soundness and athleticism. It became an immense tome on the short lived but massively influential U.S. Army Remount Service breeding program. Livingston and Roberts, in their search to quantify the pedigrees of the best horses, discovered that they unerringly traced to Remount stallions, regardless of breed. While the majority of remount stallions were Thoroughbreds, Arabians, or Morgans, they had a lasting effect on nearly every American breed.

    The authors begin, unsurprisingly, with a brief overview of warhorse history. This chapter is far more thorough than average, including both pre-Medieval and non-European sections. However, it is in places problematic, including references to a cumbersome great horse and suggesting that the Roman Empire employed war chariots in a widespread fashion. However, these are issues within the historiography they were relying on, and do not reflect the overall quality of the book. They then move quickly through the early years of the Remount services during the Civil War, not yet involved in breeding, through the massive equine casualties (riding, draft, and pack horses and mules) in several wars up through World War I. The overall scarcity of horsepower following World War I, coupled with the need for consistent quality, led to the establishment of the breeding program the Remount is now known for.

    The bulk of the book is concerned with the day to day running of the Remount breeding program, from stallion selection and placement to enlistment of Remount offspring. The book benefits from a large number of photos and excerpted letters and documents from breeders as well as Army personnel. The final chapter includes detailed pedigrees and accounts of the most influential Remount stallions. This section is largely concerned with the stockhorses- mostly Quarter Horses and Paints- the authors original sought to analyze, though other breeds are represented in the body of the work. At the end are several useful appendices, including a timeline and a list of known Remount personal and stallions. In all, War Horse tends towards the romantic but is nonetheless of incredible use to historians of modern cavalry or American breeding practices.

Coming Up in November

#ShelfieSunday theme: equids in modern warfare

Deadlines:

Equine Culture at WOCMES Nov. 5

Baroque Horses & Horsemanship Nov. 10

Environmental Humanities in Historical Perspective Nov. 15

Being Well Together: Human-animal collaboration Nov. 30

Other Deadlines:

Events:

The Perfect Horse Lecture Nov. 8   Kellogg Arabian Horse Center, Pomona, CA

Frederic Remington The Met, NYC, runs through Jan. 2, 2018

The Horse in Greek Art National Sporting Library, Middleburg, VA, through Jan. 14, 2018

Symposia in Ancient Greece National Sporting Library, Middleburg, VA, Nov. 2

Coffee with the Curator National Sporting Library, Middleburg, VA, Nov. 18

 

#ShelfieSunday: Crowdsourcing

     We put out a call for a crowdsource bibliography on twitter, and the crowd went wild! We’ll be adding these suggestions to our bibliography, and look forward to more. For this one, we talked about equines in war, 1800 to the present, which will be our theme for November, and flatracing which we will talk about in December. We still have space for a couple of reviews, so take a look through the recommended reading list! If you’re looking ahead, January is ancient equids and still wide open.

 As a reminder, our full bibliography is available as a zotero file. Contact us for a copy!